Archives for category: Special Needs

..but that is not saying much.

This report was written in 1989, back when some of us were kids.  I was a teenager.

Back in the day when children like Rowan were often sent to an institution, instead of a school, without a chance to show their talents.  Back in the day when doctors encouraged new parents to just leave their child at the hospital.. they won’t have much of a life anyway.. and refused to treat the children of those parents who didn’t listen.

This report makes me so sad. Though the discrimination in Rowan’s story looked starkly different from that in Baby Doe’s story, the underlying reasons remain very similar.

Rowan’s death was entrenched in many of the same problems so many years later.. all revolving around a doctor’s unwillingness to put forth effort in seeing the worth of his life.

The section on the Limitations of Hospital Self-Policing (pg 10) was especially poignant to me. Their statement of the clear problem that “Ethics committees are largely insular bodies, sharing the mores and limitations of the local hospital” so many years ago, is at times too much to absorb.  Such a strong recommendation from the US Commission of Civil Rights that “Outside oversight is needed” so many years ago, yet our society continues to turn a blind eye toward the self-policing of hospitals and other medical institutions.  As they did in the case of Rowan’s death.

The report can be viewed here:
https://www.law.umaryland.edu/marshall/usccr/documents/cr12m462_A.pdf

or here:

US commission on civil rights report

As the commission pointed out: “Treatment decisions.. to children with disabilities cannot be viewed in isolation.  Together with the discrimination in (a variety of contexts) these decisions may be viewed in the context of longstanding attitudes and practices toward people with disabilities” (pg 23)

On other words: If we, as a society, don’t expect quality care for all of our children, then who is really to blame?

Also, the current necessity to address Special Needs Discrimination in Healthcare

Today the news brings a new tear.

Today, my news-feed is crowded with rainbows, telling me that gay lives matter. For that I am thankful.

Today, my news-feed is crowded with pictures of the confederate flag coming down, telling me that black lives matter. For that I am thankful.

Today, my news-feed is crowded with women, being acknowledged for wonderful feats. For that I am thankful.

Today, once again, I received bad news.

Today, From the ACLU: “We have concluded that the ACLU will not be able to assist you. This decision reflects our own limited resources, and in no way reflects on the worthiness of your case.”

Today, once again, I learned that not all lives matter.

These groups fought for generations, and centuries, to be treated with liberty and justice.  And today, each of these groups, and many others, still struggle.

But those who are labeled with ‘Special Needs’ are far behind the rest.

Today’s news is disheartening, to say the least.  The irony that the ACLU stood with the CA Children’s Hospital Association in opposition to legislation that would have allowed CA parents the resources to seek justice for their children killed in CA hospitals – yet lack the resources themselves to speak out against these horrific injustices – points to the insanity that underlies the ongoing struggle for liberty and justice. (see Proposition 46)

But today’s news doesn’t really matter.

For me, external validation by our justice system is not, and was never, necessary. Rowan is making an impact, and will continue to make an impact toward the liberty and justice for others that he did not receive in life or in death.

My little kiddo accomplished a whole lot in two short years. And I will always carry him in my heart with an immense amount of pride. This bump in the road will not deter us as we continue to share Rowan’s joy, and the importance of his life, with many.

I just wish that I could be doing it with him by my side.

My daughter at kindergarten

My daughter at kindergarten

Today, I’m going to brag.  That’s right.  I’m going to tell you all the ways that my kid is smarter than your kid.

Gasp.  “Oh, no, you aren’t.”

Oh, yes, I am.

As we were brushing our teeth this morning, my daughter said “Mommy, the kids in room 18 need extra help because they aren’t as smart as us.”

And then, I spent the morning thinking about what the word “smart” means.  I even looked it up in the dictionary, which told me that smart is “having or showing quick intelligence or ready mental capability”.

And thinking about that definition left me wanting to shout about how smart my kid is.

By the age of two..

My kid understood two languages.

My kid spoke one language more fluently than I did, and was quickly learning the second.

My kid had an uncanny ability to recognize the face of someone we had only met once before (while I, embarrassingly, faltered).

My kid understood, and practiced, empathy at a level that I have rarely seen in other children or adults.

My kid had an ability to make animals at ease in a way that I, as a college-educated animal biologist, had never seen.

My kid understood the danger of fire, and tried to blow out every flame and hot object in every room we entered.

My kid knew how to share, and saw its joy.

My kid readily engaged with a new teachers for over a half-hour without my intervention.

My kid could use actual words to ask for almost everything needed throughout the day, from shoes in the morning to a book before bedtime.

My kid easily adapted to the ways of life in three different countries.

My kid knew how to operate a tricycle, go on a bike ride, build a sandcastle, jump on a trampoline, and safely ride in a kayak.

My kid had the ability to make even the grumpiest of plane passengers, shoppers, workers, and everyone else we met smile their biggest smile.

And perhaps most importantly, My kid easily functioned in, and welcomed, a world full of people who were nothing like him.

The kid that I’m writing about wouldn’t have been the one in the photo above.  He wouldn’t have been in the advanced class with his sister, or the one who rode a bike or tackled the monkey bars earlier than all the others.

My kid may have been the kid in room 18, and my kid would have been smart.

Returning back to the morning of brushing teeth.  We sacrificed being on time for school to have a conversation about what “smart” really means.  We explained that being “smart” had little to do with just learning to read, or do multiplication, sooner than others.  My fingers were crossed, in hopes that my daughter can unlearn what she learned in kindergarten. In hopes that I can make my daughter a little smarter, without her brother here to teach her this lesson with such ease.

My proud kid

My proud (and smart) kid

Peace as the world commonly understands it comes when the summer sky is clear and the sun shines in scintillating beauty, When the pocketbook is full, When the mind and body are free of ache and pain.. but.. true peace… is a calmness of soul amid terrors of trouble, inner tranquility amid the howl and rage of the outer storm..

Martin Luther King Jr.

We will never be able to lose the vision of our son being gassed to death before our eyes, without even the simplest of care or precautions afforded to other children.. because of who he was wrongly perceived to be.  But we will work to find the peace that lies within that terror.

We will always be thankful for, and will always remember, those who faced that terror along with us.  The friends and strangers who left their comfort zones to face a horrible injustice.  The doctors, researchers, and nurses who risked their own reputations to stand up for what was right.  Though we have been unsuccessful in our efforts for justice, we at least have the knowledge that there are courageous people who chose to step up and act.  Through you, and with you, we hope to find peace.

Thank you, with Rowan in our hearts

Copyright © rowansmile 2014. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author. Rowan was killed at Rady Children’s Hospital as a direct result of the careless and unnecessary use of general anesthesia for a “routine” outpatient diagnostic procedure. It is okay to post a link to this page.

“You do not have the right to say to a person: I don’t see you the way you are, I want to see you as I would be more comfortable seeing you.” Jane Elliot
I saw Jon Stewart’s piece about Eric Gardner, and I cried. I cried for Eric and his family, but I also cried because Eric’s story felt like another sucker-punch to my stomach.

I don’t think many people realize how connected we feel to these types of stories. Change the police to doctors; change racial discrimination to special needs discrimination, and you have us. Some may think that is too extreme a view, so it is a view that we don’t share with others often. But it is how we feel every day.

I don’t say this to discount racial discrimination or Eric’s personal story, but to point out that discrimination and unfairness in our society and justice system is present at many levels.

http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/a9bg2k/the-eric-garner-grand-jury-decision

After learning of the CDPH report, we are worried that Rowan was discriminated against because of his diagnosis, and therefore killed.

We feel this way because:
1. Based on Rowan’s special needs diagnosis (not on Rowan as a person), Dr. Raymond Fripp labeled Rowan as “uncooperative”
2. Because of this label, Dr. Raymond Fripp ordered the use of general anesthesia (which was dangerous for Rowan) for a diagnostic procedure
3. Because of Dr. Raymond Fripp’s label, Dr. Kathleen Kaya was not required to, and did not, provide precautions typical in all general anesthetic procedures
4. Because of #2 and #3, Rowan was killed
5. And finally, because Rowan had a special needs diagnosis, the hospital was able to justify his abysmal care. Because Rowan had special needs, the California Department of Health was able to support the hospital’s justification, and the Medical Board of California was able to ignore it.

This is how we feel.

Copyright © rowansmile 2014. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author. Rowan was killed at Rady Children’s Hospital as a direct result of the carefree and unnecessary use of general anesthesia for a “routine” outpatient diagnostic procedure.   Please visit the rest of our story: http://www.rowansmile.me

“Rowan is uncooperative”

"Uncooperative?" Rowan receiving an exam October 2013

“Uncooperative?” Rowan receiving an exam October 2013

These are the words that are being used to justify the killing of our amazing son Rowan.
These are the words that the hospital is using to justify not using (not even attempting to use)  an IV catheter, or any another precautions or monitoring before the careless use of general anesthesia.
These are the words that the hospital is using to justify the unnecessary use of general anesthesia for a diagnostic procedure.
Rowan did nothing to deserve this description, other than that he looked different than you or I. Nothing other than being born with Williams Syndrome.

Rowan was happy, playing, and cooperative before anesthetic induction. He was cooperative and without tears as the anesthesia began to flow into his body.

Rowan regularly visited doctors throughout his life, and cried occasionally, just like every other kid.  He cried: 1. Once when he had to fast for 15 hours (12:00 am to 3:30pm) and cried because he was (very) hungry, 2. Once because he had an ophthalmology appointment that lasted for five hours, 3. When he was put on an infant scale (he was happy once he got big enough for a big kid scale), and 4. ONCE (out of five cardiology appts) because he was initially scared of Dr. Fripp. He did not cry for the pediatrician, Rady’s own ophthalmologist, Rady’s own geneticist, or Rady’s own physical therapist, though he did not prefer the dentist.  Oh, and he cried at the grocery store when he didn’t get the food he wanted.

Rowan sat still and happily for blood draws without a tear, received ultrasounds without sedation, and was fascinated by whirring machines. Rowan flirted with nurses, and relaxed in my lap many times when his heart was listened to, he had his blood pressure read, or he received an EKG. Rowan consistently received positive notes from his therapists and teachers about his cooperative nature and willingness to participate.

Rowan was a very cooperative child, who was given a label because he had special needs. And that label killed him.

We are beyond infuriated, but we will not meet this injustice with anger.  Instead, we will show the world the real Rowan.

Please join us, in progress:  Rowan, one year ago today:  https://rowansmile.me/one-year-ago-today/

Copyright © rowansmile 2014. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author. Rowan was killed at Rady Children’s Hospital as a direct result of the careless and unnecessary use of general anesthesia for a “routine” outpatient diagnostic procedure.

Dear Mr. Sewell,

I am writing this letter in support of Dan and Tracey XXX’s request for a full investigation in to the negligent actions of three doctors involved in the care, and ultimately the death, of their three-year old son, Rowan. Those doctors are: Dr. Raymond Fripp, Cardiologist, Rady Children’s Hospital; Dr. Kathleen Kaya, Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesiologist, Rady Children’s Hospital; Dr. John Moore, Chief of Cardiology, Rady Children’s Hospital. As you may now know, Rowan was at Rady to have an elective CT angiogram to evaluate possible coronary artery stenosis. Rowan became hypotensive and bradycardiac while undergoing induction of anesthesia and did not recover from cardiac arrest. Rowan’s doctors and the hospital claim that Rowan died from a “pre-existing condition”, however, the facts surrounding this case do not support their claim. We ask that you investigate those facts, and the negligent actions taken by the doctors involved. Specifically:

Dr. Fripp did not provide accurate information to Rowan’s parents for informed consent, and deliberately misrepresented the risks associated with general anesthesia for children with Williams Syndrome. Additionally, Dr. Fripp did not offer Rowan’s parents, or inform them of, alternatives to anesthesia that carry little to no risk, such as play therapy— despite these alternatives being the standard of care for at risk children at neighboring Children’s Hospitals. 1

Dr. Kaya also misrepresented her knowledge of the anesthetic risk for children with Williams Syndrome and was negligent in her administration of anesthesia to Rowan on the day he died. Not only were the basic standards for all children not followed (e.g. no IV line placed prior to induction, inadequate cardiac monitoring during induction), but the specified recommended standards for children with Williams Syndrome were also ignored by Dr. Kaya.2,3 Their specific complaints are: the use of non-recommended anesthetic agent, the absence of ECMO in the CT room, no IV re-hydration to maintain hemodynamic balance, and inadequate monitoring.

Dr. John Moore deliberately misrepresented the primary reason for the CT scan in the medical record after Rowan’s death. Leading up to the procedure, Rowan’s parents were told a CT was necessary to assess the coronary arteries for signs of stenosis, which they now know if present, significantly increases the risk of sudden death under anesthesia.4 After Rowan’s death, the reason for the scan was changed to assessing his pre-existing SVAS and PAS, with no mention of coronorary artery stenosis. SVAS and PAS can easily be assessed using ultrasound- with no need for sedation or general anesthesia.

Dr. Fripp, Dr. Kaya and Dr. Moore, as well as the other medical professionals at Radys, treated Rowan as a low-risk patient, when published medical knowledge suggested he be treated as the highest risk possible. Unfortunately, these doctors have not learned from their mistakes and are still attempting to put children with Williams Syndrome under general anesthesia unnecessarily.5

A number of negligent actions and decisions made in Rowan’s case by his doctors resulted in his death, but for me, a parent of two small children, the most heinous offense was committed when Dr. Kaya called Rowan’s parents the night of his death, a call supported by Rady, and suggested that Rowan died due to the stress from crying while being put under. The utter hubris in this statement is sickening and concerning, and one of the reasons why I started an online-petition to ask the Department of Health to open an investigation into Rowan’s death, which is currently underway. We have collected over 4,800 signatures from individuals who are demanding the doctors be held responsible, and that action be taken to prevent more preventable deaths from happening due to negligence and mis-information. I have included this petition, as well as comments made by signers.

Myself, and over 4,800 people believe an investigation in to Rowan’s death is not only the right thing to do, but imperative for the safety of many other vulnerable children in your State. We hope you agree.

Sincerely,

XXXXX
1. A case report on anesthesia-related deaths of patients with WS and SVAS highlights “the potential risks of providing sedation or general anesthesia for patients with WS, SVAS, and coronary artery disease.” In: Horowitz PE, Akhtar S, Wulff JA, Al Fadley F, Al Halees Z. Coronary artery disease and anesthesia-related death in children with Williams syndrome. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth 2002;16:739-41

2. Stamm et al. suggest that every patient with SVAS should be considered high risk for myocardial ischemia. The authors point out that procedures that produce a sudden drop in coronary perfusion pressure, such as anesthesia, have led to acute myocardial ischemia and procedure-related sudden death. In: Stamm C, Friehs I, Ho SY, Moran AM, Jonas RA, del Nido PJ. Congenital supravalvar aortic stenosis: a simple lesion? Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2001;19:195–202

3. A more recent study by Ergul et al. concluded that the incidence of coronary artery defects and myocardial ischemia in children with WS is much higher than previously thought. They went on to recommend more detailed non-invasive and awake testing before considering anesthesia, and the use of mild sedation rather than anesthesia if needed. “Many deaths have occurred during anesthesia/sedation …, suggesting that decreased cardiac output from anesthetic agents in concert with coronary artery abnormalities alter myocardial perfusion.” In: Ergul Y, Nisli K, Kayserili H, Karaman B, Basaran S, Dursun M, Yilmaz E, Ergul N, Unal SN, Dindar A. Evaluation of coronary artery abnormalities in Williams syndrome patients using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and CT angiography. Cardiology J 2012; 19(3):301-308

4. In their review of the pathology of SVAS and the literature regarding sudden death associated with sedation and anesthesia, Burch et al. conclude that “with congenital SVAS, myocardial ischemia has been implicated in a majority of cases of sudden death occurring in conjunction with anesthesia or sedation. Features common to the reported cases are sudden, rapid hemodynamic deterioration associated with hypotension and bradycardia and lack of response to aggresive resuscitative measures”. They go on to further state that coronary arterial flow impairment can occur even in the absence of significant SVAS, and therefore caution should be taken regardless of the varying degrees of SVAS. In: Burch TM, McGowan FX, Kussman BD, Powell AJ, DiNardo JA. Congenital supravalvular aorticstenosis and sudden death associated with anesthesia: what’s the mystery? Anesth Analg. 2008 Dec; 107(6):1848-54

5. Comment from our online petition:
“I don’t even know where to begin… Reading this story is heartbreaking and I can’t imagine how this family feels. This story was brought to my attention a few months ago.. This hits very close to home. You see, we too live in San Diego and go to Rady’s hospital. My son actually goes to the same Cardiologist as Rowan did. Since my son was born we have had 3 Echo’s, All at Rady’s and all under sedation medicine. Most recently my sons heart went from Mild to Moderate and the Cardiologist said that giving my son sedation medicine has become more risky b/c once he eats the medicine its in his system and they have no control over it. Plus, when they do an echo it is with a nurse & Technician.. My Cardiologist suggested that our only next step would be to do an Echo under general anesthesia. Even though its more risky he would be in the hands of professionals and doctors and anesthesiologists in case something happened they would have “more control” I was very concerned obviously being that I have read so much on the WS Support page about the risks with our kids and anesthesia. I brought these concerns up to my doctor multiple times and I even brought up little Rowan b/c I had heard about him through one of our therapists whom we actually shared. My Cardiologist said it was the next step. At some point I just had to believe we were doing the right thing. But I was really scared and preparing myself for the worst. I happened to get a 2nd opinion 2 days ago at CHLA.. I was EXTREMELY surprised and shocked to have received a ECHO under with NO DRUGS AT ALL! I’m sorry but I have never been given the option. I had NO IDEA this was an option. We have sedated my baby 3 times for an ECHO and were about to put his life at risk under general Anesthesia because “this was our only option”. Are you kidding me? You can do an echo with no risk to my child’s life? You can imagine how i felt. This hospital has obviously not learned their lesson and although they did make us 1st case of the day and said he was “High Risk” They have put his life at risk unnecessarily 3 times. and were about to for a 4th. I’m sorry for the long post but after reading this I am heart broken for this family and because they shared their story I was much more aware of the risks and they helped possibly save my child. I will sign this petition and get every person I can to sign it too..”

*Note- it has since been determined that this child’s cardiologist is not the same cardiologist as Rowan’s (Dr. Fripp), but rather Dr. Moore, the head of cardiology at Rady

As we wander through the world, amongst the people whom I now refer to as the “uncomfortable people”, I often wonder what makes them so uncomfortable.  Uncomfortable with grief, I get that.  A year ago, that would have been me.    Don’t know what to say, don’t know what to do, maybe it’s best to not say anything or pretend the grief is not there.

But there’s something more.  Our grief, together with our story, seems to bring about a different kind of “uncomfortable”.  The kind that makes people feel the need to be different than us.  The kind that makes people feel the need make their child different from Rowan.

Rowan had differences.  He had a bigger smile, he had a louder “Hi!”.  He spoke a different language (sign-language) while other kids learned to talk.

And Rowan was the same.  He encouraged a friend to crawl, he loved to swing, he learned to kick his feet and blow bubbles in the bath with his big sister.  He loved his family and friends, and the world around him, and made new discoveries in that world each and every day..

To those differences and similarities, people say “Of course, of course”.  We are in the 21st century, we have come a long way from institutionalizing those who have external differences.  Of course we understand.

But.. here’s where this post in going to get uncomfortable, and I forgive you if you choose to stop here.   Well, sort of.

Because what I need to tell you is that Rowan was the same.  Rowan was the same as your child.

His entire life, a common cold was the only medical ailment that bothered him.  No visits to the ER, no hospital stays, no medications.. his entire life beyond the first four days.

Yup, he had diagnostics.  Just like your child.

And he saw lots of doctors, because he was different, and doctors were interested.  In his entire life, how many of those diagnostics revealed an ailment that needed medical treatment?  How many were more than a quick look to say “Everything looks good”?  Just one.  The one that killed him.

Rowan was the same.  That’s right.  The same as your child.  The same as any two year old visiting the hospital for a routine test.  Has your child ever received an x-ray, an MRI, an ultrasound, a lab test?  Because something about your child was slightly different than the average?  Something that made a doctor say, “we just want to take a closer look.”  If yes, than your child is exactly the same.  Rowan walked into the hospital, exactly like your child, and was supposed to walk back out an hour or so later,  just like your child.

“Wasn’t Rowan sick?”  Good question.  No one will ever know.  We know the doctors said he was “healthy” up until moments before he was killed by anesthesia.  But we will never know how “sick” he was, or if he would have lived a full and happy life with a heart that was “different” just like many before him. We will never know if he would have needed a risky surgery, or if that surgery would have been a great success.  We will never know because nobody looked at his heart before anesthesia.  Nobody looked before they gave him the poison that killed him.

So I guess that I’m trying to say that I’m okay that people are uncomfortable.  I understand why people need to feel like what happened to us cannot happen to them.  I understand why they need to hold onto the “knowledge” that their two year old is safe.  Because my empty arms are a scary site, and I understand why people  look away.

I don’t write with hopes of scaring people, or vilifying the medical practices that have saved many lives.  I write with a hope that people will look at my empty arms, and with a plea that they will face the scary reality that those arms hold.  Rowan died because too many people looked away, please don’t look away now.  For each time you do, Rowan life loses just a little bit of its importance in this world.  Is that what you would want for your child?

 

 

 

Copyright 2014@www.rowansmile.me

Please share our story with an act of kindness:  http://www.rowansmile.me

 

 

It has been six months since Rowan was killed. This week, Rowan should be attending his first day of preschool.

The other day at dinner, Rowan’s sister started a familiar conversation:

Mommy, why did Rowan die?

“The doctors gave Rowan a medicine called anesthesia. Anesthesia usually makes people fall asleep, and then they wake up. But Rowan’s heart was different than ours, and he couldn’t have anesthesia. So the anesthesia made his heart stop working and he died.”
“Why couldn’t Rowan have anesthesia?”
“Because everyone is different. Just like your friend Molly can’t eat nuts. So we have to be careful because if we gave her nuts she might die. Rowan’s heart was built differently than ours, so he couldn’t have anesthesia. We don’t know exactly why. But we do know the doctors weren’t careful and gave it to him anyway, and he died.
You can eat nuts and you can have anesthesia, but everyone is different and there are certain things each person can’t have.”
“Why did they give him (anesthesia)?”
“I don’t know. Because they didn’t pay attention. They should have listened and should have known that he couldn’t have anesthesia without being very careful, but they didn’t.”
“If Rowan’s doctor didn’t make a mistake, would he have died?”
“No.”
This conversation could take place at any table. A child does not have to have special needs to be a victim of a doctor’s hubris, it can happen to a typical child as well. Your child.

In the last six months..

  • We have worked to hold onto memories of Rowan, saving every last drawing, every last item, every last picture of Rowan’s. We talk about him, and share our memories. We try to hold onto the dream that was once our reality.
  • We have tried to find peace in knowing that our story has spread around the world, and made a difference for the many people and families who have read it.
  • We have worked to plant Rowan’s tree, so that our daughter will having something living to remember him. We have made him a part of our daily life, in his absence.
  • We have learned, with much help, exactly why and how Rowan was killed, and who played each role in his death.  With this knowledge, we now begin to heal.
  • We have tried to carry on Rowan’s lesson of embracing goodness and kindness, and tried to see in the world around us as he did.
  • We have become friends with strangers, and strengthened friendships beyond what we ever imagined.
  • We have received a tremendous amount of help from those we hardly know, who have given freely without expectation.
  • We have become a part of a community of Williams Syndrome parents who have shared their stories, and exposed their hearts.  For these things, we are forever grateful.

But..

  • We have lost friends, and had others turn away to shield themselves from our grief.
  • We have tried to talk to Rowan’s doctors, his hospital, and the institutes that oversee them. We have received no reply. We have tried to get the information that exists about our own son. We have been turned away. We have tried to obtain an external review of Rowan’s case, which was promised to us.  We have been ignored.  Instead, we receive bills for the anesthesia that killed him. Instead, we hear about how Rowan’s doctors remain lauded with praise from their peers, and Rady Children’s Hospital remains one of the highest ranked pediatric heart centers in the nation.
  • We have tried to talk to the executive director of the Williams Syndrome Association. She, too, has met any criticism with silence. Instead, Terry Monkaba states widely that “The WSA wants to provide as much information as possible to all WS families.” At the same time, we receive stories from the very families who reached out to her to change the anesthetic risk information spread by the WSA, and were ignored. She also gives credit to the Williams Syndrome Association’s medical team and “esteemed cardiac anesthesiologist with a great deal of WS experience” (RT Collins) for the WSA website’s updated information, credit to the very doctors who withheld necessary information from our community, and widely spread false information.  It was very difficult for us to realize that this group, which is very helpful and supportive of the Williams Syndrome community in many ways, also contributed to something terrible.
  • We have heard from many families. Families who have tried to talk to their doctors about the anesthetic risk associated with Williams Syndrome, and been ignored. Families who have suffered tragic experiences and great losses, and were ignored by the Williams Syndrome Association when they tried to make a change. Families who have gone to doctors with research and concerns, and had doctors proceed without precautions. Families who want to be informed advocates for their children, just like we did.
  • And we have cried, and continue to do so, many times each day.

We continue to hope that our website spreads awareness among families and doctors. But in the end we are left empty-handed and empty-heartened, with the knowledge that Rowan’s death should not have been necessary for anesthetic risk to be taken seriously.
We hope to continue to remember Rowan through our lives. We hope to begin healing, and begin concentrating on his life. Someday, when we find the strength, we hope to share his joys by building a foundation.  Maybe it will be to share music and art with children in need.  Time will tell.
With Rowan in our hearts..

 

 

Copyright © rowansmile 2014. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author.

This is the bill that arrived in today’s mail.

You’ll see the note at the bottom says: “failure to comply with this request may result in your account being placed with our collection agency immediately”.

Each time I receive these letters in the mail,  I feel like I am being delivered the smoking gun that murdered my child, and asked, “Oh, and can you pay for this?”

The bill for the anesthesia that killed Rowan.  Five months later, instead of admitting that Rowan was killed, the hospital chooses to keep adding insult to our tragic loss..

The bill for the anesthesia that killed Rowan. Five months later, instead of admitting that Rowan was killed, the hospital chooses to keep adding insult to our tragic loss..

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